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  • I would like to know how to keep the diaphragm reeds dry in between the reeds. I am having problems with them drying and sticking together which makes the diphragm sound like a single reed. Any advice would be helpful. Your turkey video was awesome!!!!
    Answer:

    H.S. Pro Staff:

    The best way I have found to keep your diaphragm reed from sticking together is to use a flat toothpick in between the reeds. One other tip if you have diaphragms you are not using keep them in the crisper of your refrigerator to prolong their life.

  • What should I look for early season when scouting since deer aren't scrape active yet?
    Answer:

    H.S. Pro Staff:

    Early season is when you should concentrate on food sources such as clover fields, alfalfa, beans, any lush vegetation in your hunting areas, as well as watering holes, especially if you have had a dry year in your area. This is what I look for when I hunt early season and I hope this will work for you too!

  • I hunt in a lot of big timber and all is bordered by crops. Do you think I should set up on the edges of the fields or should I go into the timber? I will be hunting all seasons so when would be the best time to hunt those locations?
    Answer:

    Rick White's reply:

    I prefer to hunt inside the timber, but I would have stands in both areas. First you need to determine where the deer are bedding to see if you can get into the timber without spooking any deer. Also play the wind when ever possible.
    I like to hunt field edges towards the rut using a buck decoy. It often provides a lot of excitement. You might also hunt from the edge to determine when and where deer are moving out into the field. Once you figure out where they are coming from you can concentrate on that area inside the timber. Both those areas can both provide great hunting. Good luck.

  • In late season hunting when all of the hens are bred, what would be a good way to call a big gobbler?
    Answer:

    H.S. Pro Staff:

    Call him just as you would early in the season. He will be looking for a girlfriend, so get him fired up and the let him come find you. Sometimes later in the season you may have to work a little harder getting turkeys located and a little harder to fire them up, but it will pay off. Best of Luck.

  • Can you give me some advice on finding and calling late-morning and afternoon gobblers?
    Answer:

    H.S. Pro Staff:

    Hunting turkeys in the late morning or early afternoon can be very productive. Usually about 10 a.m. the hens will start to nest or lay an egg and it will leave those toms looking for a girlfriend. This makes our job as a hunter a lot easier. What I like to do is what I call "cutt'n and runnin'." I will cover as much ground as possible, calling every 100 to 200 yards to try and spark a gobble. If I get a turkey gobbling late in the day my chances of calling that bird in and harvesting him are pretty good. I hope this will help you out in your next venture in the turkey woods.

  • Do gobblers roost in the same place every year?
    Answer:

    H.S. Pro Staff:

    Not always! Some do and some don't. Always try to locate the birds you are hunting visually and/or by using locator call, such as our Hammerin' Crow Call or Limb Shaker Owl Hooter.

  • This is my second year of turkey hunting, and am not really sure how to hunt them. Should I sit in one area and wait for them to come to me, or locate them and get as close as possible?
    Answer:

    H.S. Pro Staff:

    Scout through the winter months to locate birds and watch them until spring comes. They will then break up into smaller groups or by themselves. At this time they are gobbling so you can scout them by listening to them. Now you know where they are and when season comes around you are ready to call them to your location. Remember, always set up above them or level with them.

  • How should I hunt? The drought and hot weather has caused the corn and other vegetation to stop growing. If the feeding areas aren't there, where next?
    Answer:

    H.S. Pro Staff:

    Drought conditions require a hunter to look harder. The deer have to be eating something so it's a matter of finding their food source.
    If you have your own hunting ground you may want to look at planting a food plot. If you get any rain in the next month you can plant wheat, oats or clover. That might keep the deer on your property. Otherwise, if they can't find food they will leave to find it.

  • Are doe decoys effective in the late season?
    Answer:

    H.S. Pro Staff:

    I am sure that a doe decoy can help in late season. I think there are many variables though. First and foremost, the best thing to rely on is the predominant food source. Deer are hungry through the winter months, especially after the rut.
    On the other hand, a decoy can relate many things to the deer. It can relay safety to other deer, especially if there has been a lot of pressure and it can relay a good food source and create a visual lure to deer that are out of range.

  • What is the best way to go after a deer in velvet? August 29 open season. Use a decoy? What scents to use? Any mock scrapes? Any calls to use? I usually do not see deer till dark and the morns are cold and later real hot in ND.
    Answer:

    H.S. Pro Staff:

    Food Source is probably the best way to hunt these early season bucks. For the most part, evening hunting will be your best. Pattern your deer pre-season; at this time of year your deer will still be in feed pattern mode for the most part.
    Remember to play the wind in your favor, take your True Talker and hunt scent free. If your going to use a scent, just use straight Natural Doe Urine. Best of luck.

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