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  • What is the best type of call to use during the summer and early fall for predator hunting?
    Answer:

    Gerald Stewart's reply:

    Any food source sound and coyote pup distress are good. The type of hand call you use is dependent on the circumstance. Howlers will not work as well as in the mating season. A rabbit distress call should work well.

  • I am interested in purchasing a predator hunting rifle. I have my eyes on a .220 swift. In your opinion, what caliber of gun do you consider ideal for predator hunting taking all considerations into matter (accuracy, long-short range, pelt damage, cost,
    Answer:

    Gerald Stewart's reply:

    I use a 22.250 55 grain hollow point, but I am only interested in knockdown not pelt damage. The .220 swift is pretty good for what you are wanting. You might look to the Internet bulletin boards for some of the conversations about the .17 caliber, which some consider to be good for the best overall predator gun.
    Scopes-I have used the Luepold Varix II 3 x 9 up to this point but am excited about the quality of the Swarovski 3 x 10-42 mm that I just had mounted on a Darrell Holland Custom 22.250 varmint rifle. Good luck.

  • I always go fox hunting and some nights we will go out and kill a couple, but other nights we will go out and not see an eyeball. Why is this? Does it have something to do with the moon phase or what? I hope you can help me out. When is the best time to c
    Answer:

    Gerald Stewart's reply:

    There are many factors that come in to play, of which most we do not understand. The moon has some effect on that but I do not think we have put our finger on exactly why just yet. The most reliable moon chart that I use is at www.primetimes2.com and even it sometimes comes up blank.
    Hunt in the dark phases at night and the first and last two hours of daylight to hit the most productive hours from a practical standpoint.

  • The coyotes I hunt around home are called a lot and we have a lot of smart or call-shy dogs. Anything you can tell me to work these dogs to get them to come in?
    Answer:

    Gerald Stewart's reply:

    Use sounds that include coyote vocalizations. Also use sounds that are common to domestic animals (Housecat Distress 125A, Domestic Pig 124A, CT166 Coyote and Grey Fox, CT167 Coyote and Raccoon).

  • What is the best type cover scent for red fox, coyotes, gray fox and coon?
    Answer:

    Try coon urine. It will attract coons somewhat and not spook other animals.

  • How should I use the electronic caller, should I let it run all the time or stop it and turn it back on a couple times during the call? What calls should I use different times of the season, (I only hunt in the winter November-March) and I live in Nebrask
    Answer:

    Gerald Stewart's reply:

    There are two philosophies of calling technique and they both will work to varying degrees. You can call intermittently, choosing your time gaps depending on your own personal preferences, or call constantly with an electronic caller.
    Most people using mouthcalls will choose to call for a short while and then sit quietly for a couple minutes. You can do this for several sequences and then move to the next spot. Those using an electronic caller have the option of letting the caller do the calling for 10 to 15 minutes then move on. Both techniques will work.
    In the winter, food source sounds will work well for you. In later winter and early spring coyote vocalizations will work extremely well as calling sounds.

  • I've always had pretty good success at finding elk, but with bad weather conditions and heavy hunting pressure, they have become very call shy and much less predictable. What do you suggest for getting close?
    Answer:

    J.R. Keller's reply:

    I have found that when elk are pressured they have a tendency to go to lower elevations. If the elk haven't moved to lower elevations and are really call shy, I like to tone my calling down. You will find that elk will still be very receptive to calls but may come in silent and not screaming their guts out so try to be patient and I think you will be successful.
    Some calling techniques I have found that work well are soft cow calls on a diaphragm call. When I use this tactic I will try to sound like several elk and have had great luck with this approach.

  • I have been getting good at using my diaphragm, however I call in more hunters with it than elk. My question is, how in the world do you tell the difference between an actual elk calling you back or a hunter who is also good with a bugle?
    Answer:

    J.R. Keller's reply:

    Sounds like you have become pretty handy with a diaphragm call. Over the past couple of years I have had good luck using a bugle primarily for locating elk. Once I have located a bull I will switch over to cow calls. Now and again you have that stubborn old bull that you have to get down and dirty with that bugle, but most of the time your high pitched cow calls will do the trick. Hopefully this will remedy your dilemma with your encounters with other hunters.

  • I am just starting out. Do you have any tips for calling hogs?
    Answer:

    Gerald Stewart's reply:

    Calling hogs sight unseen can be hit or miss unless you are in an area hogs are known to be at various times of the day. If you spot the hogs during the daylight hours, set up downwind no further away than a few hundred yards. They will not come from great distances.
    If you are in an area of great hog sign (Rooting or feeding areas) or they are known to frequent daily, simply set up, preferably on an elevated spot, with good visibility and turn on your player with moderate volume. After several minutes, if nothing has shown up, increase your volume for about a minute or so and then return to where you started.
    If nothing comes in after 10-15 minutes you should move on to another spot.
    The CT127A Feral Hog Feeding Frenzy will attract both sexes and the CT124B Wild Piglet Distress will attract mainly females.

  • Where do turkeys go when it's snowing?
    Answer:

    H.S. Pro Staff:

    Turkeys will tend to feed heavy before and during the snow. So try to find the food source and if the snow keeps on coming down and piling up, look for the birds in an area that offers some shelter, like large pines or cedar trees. Good luck.

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