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  • How do I become a professional waterfowl guide and how can I get those deep grunts out of my goose call?
    Answer:

    H.S. Pro Staff:

    As far as becoming a waterfowl guide there are several things to consider...the first is, are you in close proximity to large concentrations of birds? If so, get a business plan together detailing cost of hunts. What does it include? If lodging is paid by you, where will the clients be? Are meals included? Who sets and picks up the decoys? Is bird cleaning included?
    After you establish all of these it's time to figure out how you get the word out that you are in business. You certainly will need brochures and business cards, but you need some sort of advertising to reach a broad base of hunters. Print ads (either magazine or newspaper) are the best for getting the most bang for your buck, but it's expensive so make sure before you invest in advertising you have a clear game plan.
    Another great way to advertise is through media hunts...either by entertaining outdoor writers or people that shoot video and TV shows. This is still relatively expensive because the writers will want everything (including travel) to be complimentary. The video people will usually foot the bill to get there but as a rule get the hunt, lodging, and meals complimentary also.
    On that goose call to get those deeper sounds you have to open your throat. You do this by dropping the back of the tongue down. Say whoooo and pay attention to where your tongue is. Now say key and see where the tongue is. You should notice the tongue is way down in the mouth when you say whoooo. That will make a larger cavity to give more of a resonant sound.

  • What kind of call do I use when the ducks are call shy?
    Answer:

    H.S. Pro Staff:

    When the ducks are call shy here's what I do...let them approach your set silently. Don't hail are greet them at all. After they swing over the decoys and start to leave give them the absolute best hen greeting you can. Let them work back on their own after that and see what happens.
    If you think about it what you are doing in this scenario is duplicating nature. Ducks aren't sitting there hailing incoming ducks, but after a flock passes over resting ducks you'll almost always hear a hen bark out one of those nasty greetings. The flock usually turns into the wind and sets in. Try duplicating this and I bet you'll start calling in more birds.

  • Do turkeys fight in the fall, or all year round? The reason I am asking this question is that I want to know if you can use fighting purrs in the fall or is that just a spring thing?
    Answer:

    Rick White's reply:

    From time to time turkeys will fight in the fall but for different reasons than they do in the spring. I have never had any success calling turkeys in the fall with fighting purrs. Try splitting up fall flocks and calling them back in with kee kee calls.

  • I have two questions. Do turkeys cut in the fall? How much should I kee kee?
    Answer:

    H.S. Pro Staff:

    Yes, turkeys will cutt in the fall. It is more of a dominance call. Kee-kees are a good call to use to call birds in. A kee-kee is a young, lost turkey and you want to sound lost. If you get a flock of young birds broke up, you will hear almost constant kee-kee's coming from those birds. Best of luck.

  • What is the most effective decoy in number? I have a jake, tommy, and 3 hens. Should I use them all or how many is best to use?
    Answer:

    H.S. Pro Staff:

    First of all, don't carry so many decoys that it becomes a hassle and don't put out more than you can effectively cover. If I had to use one decoy it would be a hen, because that is what the gobblers are looking for anyway. However, using multiple decoys can be very effective as long as you can remain mobile and able to change locations quickly.
    A multiple set-up that works well for me is two hens and one jake. Place the hens about three feet apart with one slightly off to the side and behind the other, then place the jake about 15 yards behind the hens as if he is following them. Make sure all decoys are within 20 yards and in a clear shooting lane. This set-up plays on the gobbler's jealousy side and more times than not the gobbler will head straight for the jake in a love-blind rage and allow a perfect shot opportunity.
    No doubt decoys can be effective in luring a bird into shotgun range, but PLEASE BE CAREFUL WHILE USING THEM. The gobbler is not the only thing out there looking for a turkey. I've heard several stories where predators like coyotes and bobcats have had close calls with hunters using decoys, but the biggest danger is other hunters. Always set your decoys at an angle to your location. This way if a hunter approaches outside of your line of vision and takes a shot at your decoy you won't be directly in the line of fire. Be safe and good luck this season.

  • If you can hear a turkey and its got hens with it, what do you do?
    Answer:

    H.S. Pro Staff:

    First, I try to figure out a direction of travel and position myself in front of them (unless I hear another turkey gobbling that I can go to). Once I feel I have the right position I will almost never call aggressively, just soft yelping and clucking and purring. Many times aggressive calling will push the hens another way. If this isn't possible I will hunt and come back to that gobbler later in the morning, around 10:00 a.m.

  • I'm fairly new at turkey hunting and I own several calls. My question is this, how many calls should I carry into the woods with me to be successful? And also, what types of calls? As well as how many of each type should I have?
    Answer:

    H.S. Pro Staff:

    I would suggest you carry at least one box call, a slate call or glass and mouth call, if you can use them. Each turkey likes different things, just as we do. I would always start with the call you feel most comfortable with. Good luck.

  • I am interested in purchasing a predator hunting rifle. I have my eyes on a .220 swift. In your opinion, what caliber of gun do you consider ideal for predator hunting taking all considerations into matter (accuracy, long-short range, pelt damage, cost,
    Answer:

    Gerald Stewart's reply:

    I use a 22.250 55 grain hollow point, but I am only interested in knockdown not pelt damage. The .220 swift is pretty good for what you are wanting. You might look to the Internet bulletin boards for some of the conversations about the .17 caliber, which some consider to be good for the best overall predator gun.
    Scopes-I have used the Luepold Varix II 3 x 9 up to this point but am excited about the quality of the Swarovski 3 x 10-42 mm that I just had mounted on a Darrell Holland Custom 22.250 varmint rifle. Good luck.

  • What is the best type of call to use during the summer and early fall for predator hunting?
    Answer:

    Gerald Stewart's reply:

    Any food source sound and coyote pup distress are good. The type of hand call you use is dependent on the circumstance. Howlers will not work as well as in the mating season. A rabbit distress call should work well.

  • I understand thar vitarack minerals should be put out all year long, especially winter and fall. I live in northern Iowa. If the snow is 2 feet deep will the deer paw down to get it? Please help me to understand if it is cost effective to put out in winte
    Answer:

    Thanks for your question. Yes, the Vita-Rack 26 does need to be put out year round even in the winter. The usage will keep the lick open and available for use. Even in the heavy snow we have seen deer digging down to get it.

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