Ask a Pro

* Required
  • If you can hear a turkey and its got hens with it, what do you do?
    Answer:

    H.S. Pro Staff:

    First, I try to figure out a direction of travel and position myself in front of them (unless I hear another turkey gobbling that I can go to). Once I feel I have the right position I will almost never call aggressively, just soft yelping and clucking and purring. Many times aggressive calling will push the hens another way. If this isn't possible I will hunt and come back to that gobbler later in the morning, around 10:00 a.m.

  • I'm fairly new at turkey hunting and I own several calls. My question is this, how many calls should I carry into the woods with me to be successful? And also, what types of calls? As well as how many of each type should I have?
    Answer:

    H.S. Pro Staff:

    I would suggest you carry at least one box call, a slate call or glass and mouth call, if you can use them. Each turkey likes different things, just as we do. I would always start with the call you feel most comfortable with. Good luck.

  • What is the best type of call to use during the summer and early fall for predator hunting?
    Answer:

    Gerald Stewart's reply:

    Any food source sound and coyote pup distress are good. The type of hand call you use is dependent on the circumstance. Howlers will not work as well as in the mating season. A rabbit distress call should work well.

  • I am interested in purchasing a predator hunting rifle. I have my eyes on a .220 swift. In your opinion, what caliber of gun do you consider ideal for predator hunting taking all considerations into matter (accuracy, long-short range, pelt damage, cost,
    Answer:

    Gerald Stewart's reply:

    I use a 22.250 55 grain hollow point, but I am only interested in knockdown not pelt damage. The .220 swift is pretty good for what you are wanting. You might look to the Internet bulletin boards for some of the conversations about the .17 caliber, which some consider to be good for the best overall predator gun.
    Scopes-I have used the Luepold Varix II 3 x 9 up to this point but am excited about the quality of the Swarovski 3 x 10-42 mm that I just had mounted on a Darrell Holland Custom 22.250 varmint rifle. Good luck.

  • How should I use the electronic caller, should I let it run all the time or stop it and turn it back on a couple times during the call? What calls should I use different times of the season, (I only hunt in the winter November-March) and I live in Nebrask
    Answer:

    Gerald Stewart's reply:

    There are two philosophies of calling technique and they both will work to varying degrees. You can call intermittently, choosing your time gaps depending on your own personal preferences, or call constantly with an electronic caller.
    Most people using mouthcalls will choose to call for a short while and then sit quietly for a couple minutes. You can do this for several sequences and then move to the next spot. Those using an electronic caller have the option of letting the caller do the calling for 10 to 15 minutes then move on. Both techniques will work.
    In the winter, food source sounds will work well for you. In later winter and early spring coyote vocalizations will work extremely well as calling sounds.

  • What type of lighting technique do you use for night hunting coyotes, red fox, and gray fox? Do you just shoot for the eyes using a red lensed light or light up the field to see predator? Please explain light technique used for each animal type.
    Answer:

    H.S. Pro Staff:

    You are on the right track with the red lens, but also try to hold the direct beam just above their head instead of directly in their face. Also use a quality scope on your rifle that has outstanding light gathering ability, such as Swarokski. Granted, quality optics can get expensive, however they are the most important part of your equipment and you will be shocked at how well you can see at night. As far as light technique is concerned, I don't really do anything different but make sure the shooter is ready when the light is flipped on because more times than not the animals won't look for long. Also, be cautious of your scent control just as you would be if you were hunting deer. Remember, these animals make a living with their nose! Good luck.

  • What is the best way to go about locating a coyote? And is early morning better to hunt?
    Answer:

    Gerald Stewart's reply:

    Scouting for coyotes can involve your eyes and your ears. Sightings, droppings and tracks can give you a general idea of the density of coyotes in your area. By the use of howlers or howling tapes you can scout with your ears. A combination of all three aspects of scouting can give you a general idea of coyote locations, travel areas and density.
    Early morning and late afternoon generally will be the most productive hours for daytime calling although the winter months can provide good calling potential during the midday hours.

  • I am planning a mountain lion hunt in a few weeks. I've never hunted cats before, and I don't have any dogs so I am going to be calling. What would be the best tequnique (cover, scents, calls, ect.) to get them into range?
    Answer:

    Gerald Stewart's reply:

    Call as you would for coyotes as far as setups. Probably should pick a spot where you have good visibility on hillsides. Lions can be pretty good at sneaking in from behind so keep the speaker out away from you.
    Sit for at least an hour at each spot. They are pretty slow in their approach sometimes.
    Don't use extremely high volume for long periods of time.
    Lions are short nosed animals that do not try to scent you as quickly as a coyote would. Scent elimination products are not as necessary but it would not hurt you to use them.
    Any of the predator calling distress sounds will but I will give a nod to the goat, pig, woodpecker, and fawn distress sounds. Good luck.

  • What is the best varmint rifle for a young beginner in predator hunting?
    Answer:

    I would recommend that you consider .17 calibers or .25-06 or.32-20.

  • When hunting wild turkey (spring) on public land, what would be the best tactic to use?
    Answer:

    H.S. Pro Staff:

    There are three good tactics to use. First, try things other folks don't--get to areas that are tougher to get to. Second, use softer, less aggressive calling. If there are a lot of hens with gobblers, act like another hen wanting to join in with their flock. Third, hunt later in the morning when the hens are nesting and the other hunters may have left the woods.

Pages